Avalanche Forecast South Coast Inland

Date Issued: Valid Until:

Avalanche Canada mconlan, Avalanche Canada

Avalanche Forecast

Wed Apr. 17th ยท 3:15PM

Alpine

Danger Ratings Considerable

Treeline

Danger Ratings Moderate

Below Treeline

Danger Ratings Low
Wind Slabs Wind Slabs
Loose Wet Loose Wet

Alpine

Danger Ratings Considerable

Treeline

Danger Ratings Moderate

Below Treeline

Danger Ratings Low

Alpine

Danger Ratings Moderate

Treeline

Danger Ratings Moderate

Below Treeline

Danger Ratings Low

New snow and strong wind are in the forecast for Thursday. For the southern half of the region, the freezing level will rise over the day, turning the snow to rain. Travel conservatively to avoid fresh wind slabs and loose wet avalanches.

Confidence

Moderate - Freezing levels are uncertain

Weather Forecast

WEDNESDAY NIGHT: Cloudy with snowfall, accumulation 5 to 10 cm, moderate to strong southwest wind, alpine temperature -2 C, freezing level 1700 m.

THURSDAY: Cloudy with snowfall, accumulation 10 to 20 cm, moderate to strong southwest wind, alpine temperature -1 C, freezing level 1800 m rising to 2500 m in the south of the region.

FRIDAY: Cloudy with rain switching to snow, accumulation 10 mm rain followed by 5 to 10 cm of snow, light to moderate southwest wind, alpine temperature -2 C, freezing level 2400 m dropping to 1700 m.

SATURDAY: Mix of sun and clouds, light to moderate northwest wind, alpine temperature -4 C, freezing level 1800 m.

Avalanche Summary

No new avalanches were observed on Tuesday. Avalanche activity should increase on Thursday as the incoming storm pummels the Coast Mountains.

If you have any recent observations during your travels, we would greatly appreciate it if you posted a photo or any other information to the Mountain Information Network (MIN). Thanks!

Snowpack Summary

Above 1800 m, around 20 to 30 cm of new snow will accumulate on Thursday with associated strong southwest wind, forming new slabs. The freezing level will rise Thursday afternoon in the southern half of the region, dropping rain onto this new snow up to around 2500 m. Below 1800 m, the snowpack is saturated and rapidly melting from rain and warm air.

Problems

Wind Slabs

Wind Slabs

Snow above around 1800 m and strong southwest wind will form new wind slabs. The snow may also be touchy in sheltered areas, where enough accumulates.

  • Use small slopes without consequence to test the bond of the new snow.
  • Expect conditions to change rapidly with aspect and elevation.
  • Be careful with wind-loaded pockets, especially near ridge crests.

Aspects: North, North East, East, South East, North West.

Elevations: Alpine, Treeline.

Likelihood

Likely

Expected Size

1 - 2
Loose Wet

Loose Wet

A freezing level rise is expected for the south half of the region on Thursday afternoon, heightening the rain-snow line. As the new snow becomes wet, the likelihood of loose wet avalanches will rapidly increase.

  • Minimize overhead exposure and avoid steep slopes during periods of heavy rain.
  • Avoid terrain traps such as cliffs and gullies that increase the consequence of small avalanches.

Aspects: All aspects.

Elevations: Alpine, Treeline.

Likelihood

Likely - Possible

Expected Size

1 - 2