Avalanche Forecast Purcells

Date Issued: Valid Until:

Avalanche Canada dsaly, Avalanche Canada

Avalanche Forecast

Wed Apr. 10th ยท 3:18PM

Alpine

Danger Ratings Moderate

Treeline

Danger Ratings Moderate

Below Treeline

Danger Ratings Low
Loose Wet Loose Wet
Storm Slabs Storm Slabs

Alpine

Danger Ratings Moderate

Treeline

Danger Ratings Low

Below Treeline

Danger Ratings Low

Alpine

Danger Ratings Moderate

Treeline

Danger Ratings Low

Below Treeline

Danger Ratings Low
Keep an eye on the sun and rising temperatures: the chance of loose wet avalanches will increase as the snowpack warms.

Confidence

Moderate - Timing or intensity of solar radiation is uncertain

Weather Forecast

WEDNESDAY NIGHT - Cloudy with clear periods and isolated flurries, up to 5 cm / west wind, 10-15 km/h / alpine low temperature -6 C / freezing level 1000 m THURSDAY - Cloudy with sunny periods and isolated flurries, trace to 5 cm / southwest wind, 10-15 km/h / alpine high temperature -4 C / freezing level 1900 mFRIDAY - Cloudy with scattered flurries, 5-10 cm / north wind, 10-25 km/h / alpine high temperature -3 C / freezing level 1800 mSATURDAY - Cloudy with scattered flurries, trace to 5 cm / southwest winds, 15-35 km/h / alpine high temperature -1C / freezing level 1900 m

Avalanche Summary

On Sunday, small (size 1-1.5) wind slabs were reactive to skiers, generally around ridge crests and steep, convex terrain above 2200 m. The most reactive deposits were in immediate lee features, including a size 2 wind slab avalanche remotely triggered from a rocky saddle 10 m away. Overnight Sunday and into Monday, a natural avalanche cycle to size 2 occurred on the western side of the Purcells Forecast region. Storm slab avalanches to size 2, with crowns 20-50 cm deep were observed in alpine terrain on all aspects. On Tuesday, skiers were able to trigger slabs up to size 1.5 in steep, gully features as low as 2200m. Explosives produced avalanches to size 2 and a helicopter remotely triggered a size 1.5 avalanche from 200 m away, these avalanches all started in steep, alpine terrain above 2400 m, mostly on northerly aspects.

Snowpack Summary

Recent storm snow sits on a melt-freeze crust on all aspects except for north slopes above 2100 m, snow remains dry. Southwest winds developed wind slabs around ridges and exposed treeline features and into the alpine. Below 1200 m, snow is disappearing rapidly.The base of the snowpack is composed of sugary faceted snow. The likelihood of triggering an avalanche on this layer is lower during colder periods and elevated during intense warming.

Problems

Loose Wet

Loose Wet

As temperatures rise and the snowpack warms during the day, the likelihood of loose wet avalanches will increase, especially in areas with fresh snow.

Avoid sun exposed slopes and overhead exposure during periods of intense sun.Use extra caution on slopes if the snow is moist or wet.

Aspects: East, South East, South, South West, West.

Elevations: Alpine, Treeline.

Likelihood

Possible

Expected Size

1 - 2
Storm Slabs

Storm Slabs

Recent snow has formed slabs in the alpine and alpine features around treeline. Use caution around ridge crests, lee terrain features and steep, convex slopes.

Be careful with wind loaded pockets, especially near ridge crests and roll-overs.Use extra caution on slopes if the snow is moist or wet.

Aspects: North, North East, East, North West.

Elevations: Alpine, Treeline.

Likelihood

Possible

Expected Size

1 - 1.5