Backcountry focussed online community.

An online community for backcountry folk, built around avalanche forecasts.

The Shape of Things to Come

Think you can figure things out by licking your finger and holding it up in the wind? Think again. In a digital age, backcountry information comes from many different sources.

Forecasts

Written by professionals, these are still the cornerstone of any pre-planning. Often spanning whole mountain ranges or states, these forecasts give a great overview of what to expect out there.

Observations

Field reports written by people on the ground. Anyone could (and should) submit an observation. See something, share it!

Threads

Got a question, ask it. Got an answer, shout it out! An open, honest discussion forum is essential for sharing vital information about current conditions.

Trend

Paying attention to past conditions and expected future events can help you make smarter decisions.

Same Great Forecasts, Repurposed

This isn't reinventing the wheel. Avalanche forecasts are sacred, and still form an integral part of backcountry planning. Avalog takes the same forecasts you already know and love, and makes them as accessible and easy to read as possible.

Avalanche Danger Ratings

Danger Ratings

Low

Natural avalanches unlikely.
Danger Ratings

Moderate

Natural avalanches unlikely, human triggered possible.
Danger Ratings

Considerable

Natural avalanches possible, human triggered probable.
Danger Ratings

High

Natural and human triggered avalanches likely.
Danger Ratings

Extreme

Widespread avalanches certain.
Danger Ratings

Below Threshold

Below Threshold.

Avalanche Problems

Wind Slabs

Wind Slabs

Wind Slab avalanches are the release of a cohesive layer of snow (a slab) formed by the wind. Wind typically transports snow from the upwind sides of terrain features and deposits snow on the downwind side. Wind slabs are often smooth and rounded and sometimes sound hollow, and can range from soft to hard. Wind slabs that form over a persistent weak layer (surface hoar, depth hoar, or near-surface facets) may be termed Persistent Slabs or may develop into Persistent Slabs.

Cornices

Cornices

Cornice Fall is the release of an overhanging mass of snow that forms as the wind moves snow over a sharp terrain feature, such as a ridge, and deposits snow on the downwind (leeward) side. Cornices range in size from small wind drifts of soft snow to large overhangs of hard snow that are 30 feet (10 meters) or taller. They can break off the terrain suddenly and pull back onto the ridge top and catch people by surprise even on the flat ground above the slope. Even small cornices can have enough mass to be destructive and deadly. Cornice Fall can entrain loose surface snow or trigger slab avalanches.

Persistent Slabs

Persistent Slabs

Persistent Slab avalanches are the release of a cohesive layer of snow (a slab) in the middle to upper snowpack, when the bond to an underlying persistent weak layer breaks. Persistent layers include: surface hoar, depth hoar, near-surface facets, or faceted snow. Persistent weak layers can continue to produce avalanches for days, weeks or even months, making them especially dangerous and tricky. As additional snow and wind events build a thicker slab on top of the persistent weak layer, this avalanche problem may develop into a Deep Persistent Slab.

Loose Dry

Loose Dry

Loose Dry avalanches are the release of dry unconsolidated snow and typically occur within layers of soft snow near the surface of the snowpack. These avalanches start at a point and entrain snow as they move downhill, forming a fan-shaped avalanche. Other names for loose-dry avalanches include point-release avalanches or sluffs.

Storm Slabs

Storm Slabs

Storm Slab avalanches are the release of a cohesive layer (a slab) of new snow that breaks within new snow or on the old snow surface. Storm-slabs typically last between a few hours and few days (following snowfall). Storm-slabs that form over a persistent weak layer (surface hoar, depth hoar, or near-surface facets) may be termed Persistent Slabs or may develop into Persistent Slabs.

Loose Wet

Loose Wet

Loose Wet avalanches are the release of wet unconsolidated snow or slush. These avalanches typically occur within layers of wet snow near the surface of the snowpack, but they may quickly gouge into lower snowpack layers. Like Loose Dry Avalanches, they start at a point and entrain snow as they move downhill, forming a fan-shaped avalanche. Other names for loose-wet avalanches include point-release avalanches or sluffs. Loose Wet avalanches can trigger slab avalanches that break into deeper snow layers.

Wet Slabs

Wet Slabs

Wet Slab avalanches are the release of a cohesive layer of snow (a slab) that is generally moist or wet when the flow of liquid water weakens the bond between the slab and the surface below (snow or ground). They often occur during prolonged warming events and/or rain-on-snow events. Wet Slabs can be very unpredictable and destructive.

Deep Persistent Slabs

Deep Persistent Slabs

Deep Persistent Slab avalanches are the release of a thick cohesive layer of hard snow (a slab), when the bond breaks between the slab and an underlying persistent weak layer deep in the snowpack. The most common persistent weak layers involved in deep, persistent slabs are depth hoar or facets surrounding a deeply buried crust. Deep Persistent Slabs are typically hard to trigger, are very destructive and dangerous due to the large mass of snow involved, and can persist for months once developed. They are often triggered from areas where the snow is shallow and weak, and are particularly difficult to forecast for and manage.

Glide Cracks

Glide Cracks

Glide avalanches occur when water lubricates the interface between the snowpack and the ground. These avalanches are difficult to predict and best managed by avoiding terrain below glide cracks.

Avalog is an open platform that makes sharing backcountry information easier. By building a community and creating discussions around professional avalanche forecasts, backcountry adventurers can access up-to-date information, helping them make smarter decisions.

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